Tag Archives: free pattern

A pair of coasters to make: another free pattern

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Another pattern, just for you guys beginning to learn how to knit.  These coasters are simple, but cute!  And they make great presents.  They use simple stitch patterns in knit and purl and the pattern is easy to follow.

Honeycomb/Mini Basketweave Coaster

Materials: 4.5mm needles (4mm or 5mm would also work)

Oddment of DK acrylic

Cast on 16 stitches

Row 1 and 2: (k2,p2) repeat til end

Row 3 and 4: (p2,k2) repeat til end

Repeat these four rows these rows 10 times until you have 24 rows.

Bind off in pattern, weave in ends.

Basketweave Coaster

Materials: 4.5mm needles (4mm or 5mm would also work)

Oddment of DK acrylic

Cast on 16 stitches

Row 1 – 4: (k4,p4) repeat til end

Row 5 – 8: (p4,k4) repeat til end

Repeat these eight rows these rows twice more until you have 24 rows.

Bind off in pattern, weave in ends.

For detailed pattern terminology, I have gone through a pattern in detail in a post from a few days ago.  Happy knitting!

 

 

Seed Stitch Dishcloth Pattern with pattern explanation for beginners

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Hi everyone!  Here is a very simple knitting pattern, for people who are just beginning to read patterns.  Here it is with a full explanation of terms:

Knit and Purl Pattern: Seed Stitch Dishcloth

Materials: 5mm needles

50g dk mercerised cotton

Cast on 20 stitches

Row 1: (K1,P1) repeat to end

Row 2: (P1,K1) repeat to end

Repeat these two rows until you have the size of dishcloth you would like, then bind off in pattern.  Sew in about 8cm of the ends using a tapestry or knitter’s needle.

Tip: cast on 16 stitches on 4mm needles with a dk acrylic for a coaster using the same pattern.  NOTE: In order for this to work as the pattern says you must use an even number of stitches.  If you have an odd number, do this: Row 1 (K1,P1) repeat until last stitch, K1.  Repeat this row until your dishcloth is the required size.

Terms explained:

50g DK mercerised cotton: this means that you need to buy 50 grams of a cotton that has been mercerised: it is shinier than normal cotton, and will be labled mercerised.  DK refers to how thick the yarn is, and stand for double knitting.  You may see either double knitting, dk or 8-ply written on the yarn, they all mean the same thing.

K = knit

P = Purl

Cast on = the process of putting stitches on the needle initially.  There arte many cast-on methods, and many videos of how to do this on the internet.

(K1,P1) repeat to end: knit 1 and purl 1 alternately through the whole row.

Bind off: the process of securing the stitches so they don’t unravel when you have finished the work.  Also called casting off, there are many videos on YouTube to help you with this.

I hope this little tour through a knitting pattern has helped you decipher what all the terms mean!  Happy knitting!

New Pattern: Cabled Headband

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Here we go, a new pattern.  I’m going to call this the 80’s throw-back cabled headband.  But I love it!

Pattern:

3mm needles

100g dk acrylic (you won’t need the whole ball)

some seed beads or other trimming

Gauge: Not important

Cast on 16 stitches

Row 1 RS: K2, P3, K6, P3, K2

Row 2 WS: K5, P6, K5

Row 3: K2, P3, K6, P3, K2

Row 4: K5, P6, K5

Row 5: K2, P3, Slip next three stitches onto a cable needle and hold at the back of the work, knit the next three stitches off the original needle, and knit the stitches off the cable needle, P3, K2

Row 6: K5, P6, K5

Keep repeating this six-row pattern until the headband is long enough to fit your head.  Afterwards, either cast off and sew some elastic onto the bottom, or do what I did and add a little stockinette stitch band after you have finished the cable pattern.  Bind off and sew ends of strip together.  Embellish with seed beads or other trimmings.  Tada!  To get an idea of the size of this headband I am wearing it in the workshop photos a couple of posts down.  This is not an ear warming headband, it’s more decrative.  It could easily be made an ear warmer by going up to 7mm needles and using a bulky yarn.

If you have stumbled here because you want an easy cable pattern but don’t want to make a headband, this could easily be turned into a mobile phone cover.  Just increase the amount of purl stitches either side of the cable stitches so it is as wide as your phone, sew a strip so that it is long enough to be seamed up and create a sleeve for your phone.  Enjoy!

What do you want to knit?

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An update on the jumper – getting there!  If only it wasn’t the same colour as the carpet, though!  Anyway,  I have a question for all you lovely folks that read my blog: I’m going to be developing some patterns over the next couple of weeks, what would you like to learn to knit?  I have plans for a Missoni-inspired cowl, some coasters, and of course a phone cozy.  Any burning desires to knit something different?  Let me know!

Crochet Snood/Cowl – A souvenir from the USA – pattern here too!

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Well, I am currently in Belfast, and because I flew with no hold baggage I wasn’t able to take my knitting with me.  So I brought a couple of crochet hooks instead.  That’s why you’re seeing so much crochet on this blog at the moment!  I also find that having crochet with me gets rid of any flying nerves I might be having, and the only reason I actually took up crochet is because I fly quite often!

Anyway, another place I flew to  recently was America, and when I was there I decided I would get a ‘typical’ American yarn I’m always hearing about on the internet, as a souvenir.  I looked at Red Heart, and Peaches and Cream, but finally decided on a ball of Caron Simply Soft, in a really nice peacock blue.  I intended to knit a cowl, but since I was flying thought I might as well crochet it instead.  And I am really pleased with the results!  I started off attempting to make a moebius openwork cowl from a pattern (and I’m really sorry, but I can’t remember where that pattern was from), but, well I am a very novice crocheter and it didn’t go well.  So I set out to make a cowl I knew I could make.  It was also supposed to be a moebius, but I was in the car and couldn’t be bothered working out how to crochet into the bottom of the chain so I didn’t (how lazy) and so it has a double twist instead, which I think I like better, actually.

Apparently it can also be worn as a hood… but I don’t think I will.  I’m not sure I’m a hood person, I prefer hats.

Does it look like I’m in the jungle?  I’m actually in my boyfriend’s parent’s back garden.  His Mum is a brilliant gardener!  Anyway, here is a close-up of the cowl.

Anyway, so here is the recipe (probably more of a recipe than a pattern – as I said, I am no expert at crochet!)

All directions are in American, I learnt from American books and websites.  And the yarn is American so that’s fine!

sc = single crochet

dc = double crochet

trc = triple crochet

Hook size: 6mm

Yarn: 300m Aran weight

Ch 100

Sc into 2nd ch from hook, sc to end.

Twist sc chain and join in round.  Join so that you will crochet into top of sc if you want a double twist, or into bottom of starting chain if you want a moebius (make sure you have only twisted it once, however!)

Round 2: dc

Round 3: sc

Round 4: trc

Round 5: sc

I alternated the dc and trc rounds, with an sc round between each.  I finished with a dc round and then a sc round to make a firm edge, and then I did a crab stitch edging around both edges of the cowl.  Hope this all makes sense!

I have two days left without my needles and about 50g of DK acrylic so I’m off to find something else to crochet now!